Event Recap :: Studio Q deCordova Visit


Photo by Marcus Hamblin
By Jim Hornor, B.Arch Candidate

On Saturday, April 28, 2012, members and friends of Studio Q enjoyed a visit to the deCordova Sculpture Park in Lincoln, MA.

Photo by Marcus Hamblin
Established in the 1950s, the 35 acres of the beautifully landscaped gardens, well-maintained forests and lawns was originally home to art and sculpture collector, Julian deCordova. He traveled the world and selected artwork for his residence that "served as the medium for self-improvement and enlightenment." At the time of his death, deCordova gave his property to the town of Lincoln with the stipulation that the estate would become a public showcase of art.

Photo by Marcus Hamblin
The architecturally interesting security house was only a preview of the over 60 sculptural experiences that we encountered on the estate, Saturday morning. The first and probably most impacting piece that caught our eyes was The Musical Fence designed by Paul Matisse in 1980. The aluminum bars cast in reinforced concrete had a clear visual interest, but no disclaimer or instructions were needed when a few sticks were spotted in fixed containers on either end of the piece. In no time, we were all skipping alongside the sculpture dragging our sticks across the sounding bars.

Photo by Marcus Hamblin
Rain Gates designed by Ron Rudnicki in 2000, Male Baseball No.1 by Yoram Woldberger in 2009, and Requiem for the 20th Century by Nam June Paik in 1997 were some other notable installations that left an impact on our visit.

Photo by Marcus Hamblin
With an exploration of all the senses, our visit took advantage of the beautiful weather, picnic lunch, and artistically crafted sculptures as we prepare for the last few weeks of the semester come to a close.  A special thanks to Atelier for sponsoring our trip to de Cordova!

To see more photos of our visit, click here.