Blog Pick :: Home Design Find


photo from www.homedesignfind.com
Written by Alyce Packard, BID candidate

Home Design Find is both a magazine and a blog for home design products and ideas. They have a team that is always looking for hot home design trends, innovations, and inspirations. They cover everything and anything design related whether it be lighting, interior design, architecture or furniture.

One project they featured that I found very exciting is the Green Apartments in Taiwan. The apartment building was designed by Vincent Callebaut and it suggests that a completely new culture could replace our civilization and could become the norm.

photo from www.homedesignfind.com
Unlike some other irregular shaped buildings that seem to be shaped differently just for the sake of being different, this building's shape serves a purpose and makes it so that there is no definite sunny side of the building. All of the transpiration will provide a natural cooling effect similar to the one you would experience when entering a forest.

  
photo from www.homedesignfind.com
The Agora Garden is designed with a double helix structure and it twists up around a fixed central core. The double helix shape has cantilevered levels that serve a purpose. Both the double helix and the cantilevered levels work to expose the maximum amount of greenery to the sunshine. The building will have the metabolism of a living organism and it will facilitate the recycling of organic waste and rainwater reclamation.

photo from www.homedesignfind.com
Another project that grabbed my attention was Roy Lichtenstein's studio that was preserved in Greenwich Village. Everything about this is cool, classic, and smart. These windows are called eyebrow skylights and they are openings in a new green roof over Roy Lichtenstein's art studio. The object to the right is one of his many pop art sculptures featured on the roof.

photo from www.homedesignfind.com
These openings are just as impressive on the inside in the daytime as they are from the outside at night time. They’re simple, beautiful, and functional. They light up the studios.

photo from www.homedesignfind.com
This studio is still the home of his widow Dorothy Lichtenstein. The renovation recreates the youthful joy of the 1960's era. An era when whitewashed brick first became popular and when dwellings were first repurposed from old warehouses and churches. References to the pop art movement appear throughout the architect's subtle renovation and they succeeded in creating an ode to Lichtenstein's humor in a low key way that is reminiscent of the 1960's.